Pages from Baseball's Past

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Stengel Crystal Ball2 tiny

Menu

Subscribe | Home | FAQ | Samples | Endorsements | Radio Show | Contact us

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: subscribe

 

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball Home

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball FAQ

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball Samples

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball Endorsements

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball Radio Show

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: tinybaseball Contact Us

   

  

        Frequently Asked Questions 

 

My subscription is no longer coming through and it has not expired. How do I fix this?

 

How is the text version an enhanced story form?

 

How often do the stories come out and in what format?

 

How much does a subscription cost and what forms of payment are accepted?

 

As a subscriber, what copyright restrictions are there in my reproducing the text version?

 

Are the stories ever repeated?

 

Is my subscription transferable to another email address?

 

What is your privacy policy?

 

If I find a mistake, have additional detail on a story, or have a fresh story idea, will you listen?

 

My subscription is no longer coming through and it has not expired. How do I fix this?

This is likely due to our necessary “Bounce-Back Policy.” Most subscribers never have an email bounce back to us, but if there are too many bounce backs — particularly the kind known as “hard bounces” — some servers automatically put us on a spam list, something that would affect ALL subscribers. So we have an automated policy to remove bounce back addresses from our delivery list. “Hard bounces,” such as an inactive account or undeliverable address, are removed immediately from our delivery list. “Soft bounces,” such as a recipient’s server being overloaded or down at the time of the delivery, get eight chances before being removed from the list.

 

If your subscription is paid up but not being delivered, your address has probably been removed from the delivery list under the Bounce-Back policy. We will go to great lengths to help you resolve this problem and restore your subscription and provide stories missed. We have a special form for reporting a likely bounce-back problem. A link to it is on our home page. You can also click here to access it.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

Why do a text version of the radio show and how is the text version an enhanced form?

As large as a radio audience can be, the show still misses a large part of its potential audience. We have long-time fans who bemoaned the loss of the show when they moved beyond the range of the broadcast or they had a change in their schedule that kept them being able to hear the show. Being able to download a text version has the luxury of never missing a story and being able to read it at your convenience. And of course the differences between a verbal story and a written story provide a variety of ways to enhance a story.

 

As the writer of the series, when we did the book The Man Who Stole First Base, it was a delight to be able to add visual elements that cannot be part of a verbal story. Pictures can make a story feel more alive, and they can sometimes even play an active role in telling the story. It is also inevitable with baseball stories that there will often be statistical content, and you can only do so much of that in a verbal story without confusing or losing the listener. But if your listener could see it in a simple chart it would be easily digested as part of the story.

 

If you have had the opportunity to hear the show, a common experience for many stories is “Did I hear that right? That’s amazing,” and you wish you could hear it again because you want to share that story with someone and you would like to get it right. It is always easier to re-tell a story if you can review it, and a text version allows you to do exactly that. It is like having a recording of the show.

 

The biggest difficulty in writing the radio show was the extreme time constraint that the show requires. More than once I set out to write a story for the radio show and finally had to discard the whole story because it simply could not be told in an entertaining fashion in the time frame allowed. And a large number of the radio shows are missing fun details that should be part of the story for the maximum entertainment value, but they have to be cut because of time constraints. Both Eric and I can tell you that the bulk of final editing of the radio shows were as much about making it fit as about making the story better. The text version allows slightly longer versions and a way to mention details that may not be of interest to the general reader but which can be tucked away in the endnote for those who might be interested.

 

Rest assured that one of the most enjoyable aspects of the radio version will be preserved in the text version. The beauty of a verbal story is that it pushes you toward brevity; the danger of a written story is that it tempts you to go too long. Whether you hear or read Pages from Baseball’s Past you are not going to be swamped by a lengthy story. The truth is that many long stories are really a bunch of small stories told together. If it’s an event or a player that is worthy of a long story, a lot of times the best and most charming way to tell it is to break it into individual self-contained stories. For example, over the years we’ve told roughly a dozen stories related to the 1919 Black Sox scandal. They could be combined into a lengthy article suitable to maybe a research journal, but that’s not what we are shooting for with Pages from Baseball’s Past.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

How often do the stories come out and in what format?

There are two stories a week (Monday and Friday) with three holidays off in the winter (Monday or Friday closest to Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years Day) for a total of 101 stories.

 

The stories are in PDF format, which is a common fixed format that is read easily across the various operating systems. Most computer users already have a PDF reader installed on their system, and if not, there are many free PDF readers available online. A PDF document avoids any of the formatting mistranslations between email programs when writing “inline” emails, and it makes it easier to add a variety of pictures to the stories. The PDF format also makes it easy to save a copy and read off-line or to print out a story if you want a hard copy.

 

PDF stands for Portable Document Format. Adobe’s free PDF readers are the most popular and can be downloaded at the following site for all the main operating systems (Windows, Mac, Linux).

 

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: get_adobe_reader Click this button to go to Adobe’s download page for all versions of their free PDF readers.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

How much does a subscription cost and what forms of payment are accepted?

Thanks to the economy of electronic mail (email) the cost of a one-year subscription is just $21 for one year, and $40 for two years.

 

We accept online payments through PayPal. And even if you don’t have a PayPal account, PayPal will still handle a credit card payment for you. We also have a mail-in form for payment by check or money order. We recommend PayPal as an excellent way to pay safely and conveniently for your online purchases.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

As a subscriber, what copyright restrictions are there in my reproducing the text version?

The attached document you receive by email has copyright protection, but like you I’ve never gotten around to reading U.S. Copyright Law {Title 17 U.S.C. Section 101 et seq., Title 18 U.S.C. Section 2319}.

 

My business philosophy is: I’m more interested in making things easier for the honest than to make things difficult for the dishonest.

 

I have chosen to go with a very trusting form of distribution that provides the greatest convenience to the subscriber. I’m not going to ask you to learn yet another username and password and work out a schedule for visiting the website to read the latest “Page,” and I want it to be easy rather than difficult to print out a hard copy if that is the way you prefer to read the story. I want to make it as positive an experience as I can for the subscriber.

 

I assume copyright law frowns on unauthorized reproduction of a copyrighted PDF linked through subscribed email. I will tell you as the author what my hope is, that subscribers will limit forwarding their link or sharing their subscribed copy to the following:

 

1)    For their own personal convenience, that is, that they are the intended recipient

2)    To share a story that is of singular interest to the recipient

3)    To serve as a sample that will inspire the recipient to subscribe

 

I’m not naive. I know there are going to be situations where readers are tempted into playing a little loose with their subscription. For example, someone will have a neighbor that they know would love these stories and like to subscribe but they are not computer literate, and, so, the subscriber will decide to print out copies from their subscription and give them to that fan. That’s why the subscription page has a “bonus” option where a subscriber can slip us a bonus of $10 to $20 as their conscience might dictate. And if you think the stories are great, the service impeccable, and you want to send us a tip, more power to you.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

Are the stories ever repeated?

If it’s a good story, you bet! Let me put it this way, have you ever heard a good story and then been delighted to hear it again several years later? Isn’t that the hallmark of a good story? That being said, right now we are on a cycle where some stories are not repeated for ten years! And that extreme cycle grows longer every year as the number of new stories is always greater than the number of stories retired.

 

Some of the best or most meaningful stories do come around more frequently, sometimes as recent as a four-year cycle. In the past 25 years there have been a handful of stories that have run six times. Hundreds have been shared just once. But if a story is repeated,  every single time it is gone over anew and 99% of the time it is updated or changed — hopefully improved — and sometimes completely rewritten to bring out another angle of the story. Those improvements will be even more significant with the enhanced text version where we have the option to easily fit in new details and add rarely seen pictures.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

Is my subscription transferable to another email address?

Yes, a link for this is in each delivery email for the stories. For security reasons we do not link to it off the website.

 

[click here to return to the top]

 

What is your privacy policy?

Very simple. We do not provide your email address or any other contact information to anyone at any time.

 

[click here to return to the top]

If I find a mistake or have additional detail on a story, or even have a fresh story idea, will you listen?

Absolutely. We have ample proof over the years that we can swing and miss, or boot a ball. We want to get it right the next time the story is told. And we welcome details that you might have that could be an interesting addition to a story. As far as new story ideas, we didn’t get a lot of them from listeners of the radio show, but sharing story ideas is more common now we are using an email delivery system. Use the Contact Us page to send your corrections, extra details, and story ideas, or simply put it into a reply to any email sent from us. At this point we do not send any “do-not-repy” emails.

 

[click here to return to the top]

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: error              Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: gehrig follow-through 

 

 

The E-Version of  Pages from Baseball’s Past is dedicated to the memory of Stan Reynolds